Program day 1 Program day 2 Program day 3

08.00
REGISTRATION
09.00
Welcome by Master of Ceremony Tom Taylor (President APM) Opening by Mladen Radujkovic (President IPMA) & Joop Schefferlie (President IPMA-NL) Keynote: Professor Richard Wiseman (Psychologist, Author, Magician)- The Luck Factor
The Luck Factor
Why do some people lead happy successful lives whilst others face repeated failure and sadness? Why are some people always in the right place at the right time, while others are always unlucky?
For many years psychologist Professor Richard Wiseman has worked with some of the world’s luckiest and unluckiest people to answer these fascinating questions.
10.15
BREAK + POSTER SESSIONS
10.15 – 10.30 Poster Session 1
Formalising the informal? – Finding a balance between formal teams and communities of practice in a project-based organisation

The paper focuses on how a Scandinavian project-based organisation utilises both formal teams and communities of practice (CoP) in order to facilitate learning and knowledge sharing.
It also looks at the challenges and opportunities that are associated with this process. The purpose of the study on which this paper is based was to see how this Scandinavian project-based
organization transformed itself into a double-knit organisation – utilising effectively both formal and informal structures.

Ronald TebogoKeikotlhaile, Anandasivakumar Ekambaram, Siri Boe Halvorsen and Ole Jonny Klakegg

KEYNOTES STREAM
BEST PRACTICES
ACADEMIC
THE EXPERTS
Diamond Room 1+2
INNOVATION
Mees Auditorium
IMPROVING PROJECTS
Van Oldebarneveldt Room
LEARNING ORGANISATION
Leeuwen Room 1 + 2
CONNECT!
Goudriaan Room 1 + 2
ACADEMIC 1
Penn Room 1
ACADEMIC 2
Penn Room 2
10.45

11.30
Milestone Management, a simple quatitative breakdown of project deliverables
PAJosé E. Reyes, (Panamanian Association of Project Management), Panama
The quantification of project milestones implemented as needed in project controls helps the project director to mitigate the risk of underperformance. Applied in a systematic way, Milestone Management will become a new element of project management competence as it proves its effectiveness. Mr. Jose Reyes will address issues associated with not achieving a milestone and the methodology he implemented as Project Director of the Third set of Locks Construction of the Panama Canal.
Innovation in Space Projects; a challenge or a risk?
Hans Bol (TNO), The Netherlands
How to deal with uncertainties and implementation of new technology into advanced products, such as space instruments? Project Managers must operate within the triangle of strict requirements, a challenging time schedule and a fixed budget keeping in mind the high quality level required by the customer. This presentation will give best practices and guidelines on how to manage innovation in complex product developments.
Winter at the Dutch Railways – don’t underestimate the power of routine
Timo Van De Walle (NS), The Netherlands
Peter Scheffel (ProRail), The Netherlands
After three years of winter chaos in Dutch railway transport, The Ministry of Infrastructure & Environment, NS and ProRail started the Winter Program. A large customer orientated program in the public domain, challenging, complex and under constant time pressure, demanding constant alignment with public opinion and external stakeholders and touching the way of working for thousands of people working in the railwaysector. Attend this session to learn about the way NS and ProRail have managed to be prepared for crisis situations.
Captain Hindsight strikes again!
Huub Van Der Wouden (NS Reizigers), The Netherlands
No matter how many Lessons Learned we share, in new projects, the same mistakes are made over and over again. How often does a Lesson Learned really provide a new insight? And how often does Captain Hindsight tell us: “you should have…” ? This presentation discusses in which way social groups preserve knowledge and how we could make this knowledge available for beneficial use.
The Project Team, or how to drive a car with wheels turning in opposite directions?
GBOlivier Lazar (Valense Ltd.), United Kingdom
The major challenge for the project manager lies in his team: ensuring members are committed, motivated and aligned. A project team is a complex being, gathering many different individuals, with different personalities, cultures and expectations. We will see how to deal with these differences all along the project life cycle. We will talk about conflicts, management and when to switch between leadership styles.
Cultural practices of governing mega-projects: the case of the Panama Canal Expansion Program

Alfons van Marrewijk and Karen Smits (VU University Amsterdam), The Netherlands
The debate on governance in project management literature is dominated by research on governance ex-ante while research on micro processes of governing during execution is missing. This paper fills this gap by focusing on mega-projects as cultural phenomena. A one-year ethnographic field study of the Panama Canal Expansion Program (PCEP) mega-project was conducted to study the cultural practices of governing. This paper makes a two-folded contribution to the project management field. First, we further develop heterogeneous understanding of culture and understand mega-projects as living worlds. Second, the ex-post micro processes of governing show the contextual influence on governance structure in the execution of megaprojects.
Project Management Training

Steven Nijhuis (Utrecht University), The Netherlands
Measuring the effect of project management education is a challenge especially when focused on behavioral skills. Research often turns to the method of Students Assessment of Learning Gains (SALG), which can be questioned on reliability. This article constructs five design criteria for an improved Students Assessment of Learning Gains and reports on two tests. The first test on a semester of a professional master in project management yielded ambiguous results. The second test added a 360 degrees measurement, with different students. The different measurements seem to aggree on an aggregate level about the learning gains, but not on student level.
11.45 Masterplan 2025 Amsterdam Airport Schiphol: Schiphol constructs, converts, connects
LU
Daniel van den Dries (Schiphol Group), The Netherlands
Schiphol has launched a large-scale program of renovations aimed at strengthening capacity and efficiency and enhancing passenger comfort. The first phase of work has already kicked off, comprising an airport-wide transition to central security. This presentation will highlight the preparations and progress of the Masterplan Program.
Delivering Innovation for Visionaries
GBMaura Launchbury (Diamond Light Source Ltd), United Kingdom
UK’s national synchrotron science facility is operating in an uncertain world where the purpose of the project is to deliver the unimaginable. Conventional project management rules have to be re-examined and re-written. Maura Launchbury explains how Diamond approaches project management by showing examples where all the rules have been broken, dialogue has reigned and yet another nationally significant facility is about to be delivered.
XL Projects – does size really matter?
PLBlaze Goraj (Hewlett Packard), Poland
This presentation tackles the problems in large IT infrastructure projects, which usually occur on the edge between people and technology. How does the need for a dialogue between stakeholders affects these projects? How can you enable this dialogue? Blaze Mark Goraj will share practical concepts including solutions and lessons learned.
Improving distributed / offshore application development efficiency through effective dialogue
Jacques Dunselman (Capgemini Nederland BV),
Wouter van Twillert (Capgemini Nederland BV), The Netherlands
Especially for agile projects, co-location is said to be one of the key factors for successful delivery. This is in contradiction with the worldwide trend to offshore IT. Jacques Dunselman shares “the One Team approach”: The distributed team has multi-skilled team members who are cross-functional and cross-discipline and has an innovation oriented culture imbedded in its DNA. Through striving to improve continuously, the team becomes high-performing.
The 4 Disciplines of Execution
Ronald van Westering (FranklinCovey Benelux), The Netherlands
Between Strategy and Execution is a gap, caused by the whirlwind of daily business. People aren’t stupid or lazy, they are busy. The key to building a culture of execution is through dialogue. The 4 Disciplines of execution: 1. Focus on a Wildy Important Goal, 2. Act on lead measures, 3. Keep a compelling scoreboard, 4. Create a cadence of accountability.
Error culture in software development
DEStefan Lipowsky (IT-Economics GmbH Munchen), Germany
Projects Making errors takes a good chance to increase productivity and quality and is a necessary base for being innovative. But in many software developing projects people try to avoid and to hide errors – more than to discover and to learn from errors. .It’s a challenge to establish a suitable error culture -now here’s a first step by understanding the history of error culture and examining the existing error culture in software development teams.
Balancing disintegrative and integrative tendencies: Leadership for shared project identification
Liselore Havermans, Deanne den Hartog, Anne Keegan, The Netherlands
Project teams are subject to disintegrative tendencies arising from team diversity and the finite nature of projects. These disintegrative tendencies should not be eliminated. Rather, they should be balanced with integrative tendencies. We study the role of leadership in enabling shared identification as an integrative tendency in project teams in two studies, one using qualitative and the other using quantitative data.
12.30
LUNCH BREAK
LUNCH SESSION:
Multi Location Project (Global Projects), Part 1
J.D. Alexander (OSD Ltd.) & N. Jago (Davis Langdon, An AECOM Company
Do you want to learn about the theory on how to conduct multi location projects combined with practical experiences of managing projects across borders or in multiple languages? Do you want to share your own experiences? These presentations identify challenges, global aspects, team management, communication, organisation and culture to achieve the best outcomes for multi location projects.
LUNCH SESSION:
Collaboration
Marian Bosch (Delft Univeristy of Technology
Trust. Creativity. Collaboration. Motivation. Leadership. Well-being. Personal Development.
How do these human factors influence your project and program management choices, behavior and attitudes? The Dutch National Research Group asked dozens of project and program managers in a national workshop series earlier this year that brought together academic and industry leaders in the field of project management. The answers will inform, motivate and inspire you. Please join us in a special series of master classes held each day in during the lunch break of the congress. More information on the series and DNRG will be provided, and opportunities for your involvement in the next stages as we create tools based on this research will be identified.
LUNCH SESSION:
Motivation
Rob Evers (Eindhoven University of Eindhoven
Trust. Creativity. Collaboration. Motivation. Leadership. Well-being. Personal Development.
How do these human factors influence your project and program management choices, behavior and attitudes? The Dutch National Research Group asked dozens of project and program managers in a national workshop series earlier this year that brought together academic and industry leaders in the field of project management. The answers will inform, motivate and inspire you. Please join us in a special series of master classes held each day in during the lunch break of the congress. More information on the series and DNRG will be provided, and opportunities for your involvement in the next stages as we create tools based on this research will be identified.
13.45

14.30
Next Generation “Agile” PM
Dean Kashiwagi, PhD, PE, Fulbright Scholar, IFMA Fellow, Director of Performance Based Studies Research Group (PBSRG), USA
A new approach has been created and tested extensively in the Netherlands: the Best Value approach. The approach uses “the lack of information” to identify expertise, requires a language of metrics for communication, replaces management, direction and control with the utilization of expertise and creates transparency to mitigate risk. The approach is documented with two significant ITC examples.
The fragile balance between Innovation and Project Management
part 14 short pitches followed up by a discussion
Joost Smits (ASML),
Willem Posthouwer (Friesland Campina),
Pim Nelemans (Dockwise),
Albert-Jan Pomper (Ranj Serious Games), The Netherlands
1. The challenging triangle of Innovation, Project Management & Time-to-Market within ASML
2. Forget about control, get in the driver’s seat
3. From drawing board to reality – Innovation in a conservative industry
4. Ensuring space for creativity within Project Management: crucial for real innovation.
The Metis of Projects. How to remain cognizant of a project’s (social) complexity
Ben Berndt (Nationale Nederlanden Group), The Netherlands
The Metis of Projects
During this presentation, Berndt touches project (social) complexity and introduces whole systems methodologies, in which group understanding is used to continually take a next step. He follows Hugo Letiche and Michael Lissack’s emergent coherence concept: managers should steer clear of frameworks in order to come to grips with the complex. Berndt concludes by describing his multi- view, multi-tool participative project management style, which he thinks best aligns with (managing) the complex.
Expanding personal influence and impact to deliver successful IT Collaborations
Morgan Thomas (UMBRIO), The Netherlands
Whether you work in retail, oil and gas, mining or IT, it’s ALWAYS people that deliver effectively or ineffectively. How do you tap into their commitments in such a way that motivates them to take ownership and responsibility beyond their job description? This includes you, not just your teams. And how do you engage others and elicit high performance from those around you?
Multi Location Projects (Global Projects), Part 2
AUJohn Dennis Alexander (OSD Ltd.)
Nick Jago (Davis Langdon, An AECOM Company), Australia
Do you want to learn about the theory on how to conduct multi location projects combined with practical experiences of managing projects across borders or in multiple languages? Do you want to share your own experiences? These presentations identify challenges, global aspects, team management, communication, organisation and culture to achieve the best outcomes for multi location projects.
Merging two mind sets into One Success: Industry and Education – an unrealistic undertaken or crucial today requirement for tomorrow success
USThomas Baumann, Sarah Harfst, Amy Cell, Deborah Bayer, Bill Boswell (Orbitak International LLC), USA

In US – here Michigan- industry, education and government stakeholders are redefining their partnerships to reduce critical skill gaps. This is a paradigm shift in technical and professional education and the collaborative processes which requires a critical review of methods, innovative development and human factors management including explanation, understanding, acceptance, personal development, and trust. The paper will explain and analyze several highly visible and innovative adaptations of industry and educational standards as well as crucial human factors and their mechanisms behind.

Towards a taxonomy for project management competences
Steven Nijhuis, Joseph Kessels, Ruben Vrijhoef, The Netherlands

For comparing research results and for identifying key educational challenges a taxonomy for project management competences is needed. A review of taxonomies shows that a hyperdimensional taxonomy and an open systems taxonomy, both for management competences, could be best suited for this purpose. Comparing research results and these taxonomies shows that both accommodate for most research results (>95%). With several added specific competences the hyperdimensional taxonomy offers the most specificity and therefore looks the best suited for the purpose of the paper.

14.45
The challenges of a large multidisciplinary, multicultural space program.
ITGiuseppe Sarri, Head of the Gaia Project, European Space Agency (ESA), Italy
One of the most challenging space mission of the European Space Agency was launched in December last year and it is now harvesting science data. The Gaia spacecraft will create the most detailed 3-dimensional map of 1 billion stars of our home galaxy. The presentation addresses the complexity and challenges of managing a multidisciplinary, multicultural large space program where many stakeholders and interests (scientific, industrial, political) are involved.
The fragile balance between Innovation and Project Management
part 24 short pitches followed up by a discussion
Joost Smits (ASML),
Willem Posthouwer (Friesland Campina),
Pim Nelemans (Dockwise),
Albert-Jan Pomper (Ranj Serious Games), The Netherlands
1. The challenging triangle of Innovation, Project Management & Time-to-Market within ASML
2. Forget about control, get in the driver’s seat
3. From drawing board to reality – Innovation in a conservative industry
4. Ensuring space for creativity within Project Management: crucial for real innovation.
Effective relationships with stakeholders
Agnieszka Maria Gasperini (PMC), Poland
Relationships with stakeholders are the key ingredients to successful project management. This presentation introduces principles of the Relationship Awareness Theory by applying a self-assessment tool called SDI (Strength Deployment Inventory).
The SDI improves effective communication with stakeholders. Agnieszka shares the ins and outs of this method which enables completing projects in time, with high-quality results.
Managing virtual project teams without email, is that possible?
Peter Wijngaard (Atos Consulting), The Netherlands
Project teams are heavily depending on email. For the Project Manager, it is even worse: he or she will receive all communication of the team (and the stakeholders). A solution is to aim for a project environment with as less email as possible, in fact for Zero Email ™. Improve your project results and learn how to incorporate this solution in your organization.
New World of Work
Arjan Oude Kotte (Microsoft B.V. Nederland) The Netherlands

The New World of Work is a different way of working and of working in a team using the latest technology. This presentation explains the philosophy and the origins of the New World of Work, invented by Microsoft. The advantages and disadvantages will be discussed. Based on own experience Microsoft will share lessons learned and give advice on how to implement the New World of Work.

How sense-making undermines project management
Louis Lousberg and Gerolf Pikker, The Netherlands

Humans make sense of situations they are in. They attach meanings to events and act according to these meanings. They do the same in projects. Processes of sensemaking are ongoing and new insights or unforeseen situations can alter the initial sensemaking of a project. Although these ongoing processes can undermine projects, they can also strengthen them. In our paper we demonstrate the importance of sensemaking in the case of the renovation of the Vondelpark pavilion in Amsterdam.

Public perspectives on project succes – influenced by national culture?
Leonie Koops, Marcel Hertogh, Hans Bakker, The Netherlands

Within the European Union national governments are the largest initiators of large infrastructure projects, which are put up for tender in an international market. In this context it is essential for consultancies or contractors to better understand their public client. We conducted a research using Q-methodology to expose managerial viewpoints on project success in different European countries. The respondents in the research performed early 2014 are governmental project managers.

15.30
BREAK + POSTER SESSIONS
15.30 – 15.45 Poster Session 2
Developing countries’ enterprises those are willing to improve their employees’ capabilities which would lead them to have innovative organizations and bring them a permanent competitive advantage,
can form strategic alliances with other successful enterprises to share their knowledge and learn from each other indeed. however to have a successful learning process, we should know the factors which influence
this process and to recognize these factors we can review the studies which have been done by expert researchers in this field and derive a list of critical success factors (CSFs), which is the aim of this paper.

Razieh Tavallaei, Mujtaba Hosseinali pour and Amirhossein Mohebifar

16.00
Managing innovation for the bottom billion: The case of malaria
Bart Knols (In2Care), The Netherlands
Ebola is bad, but malaria is far worse. Although malaria is completely preventable, some 725.000 African children and pregnant women still die each year as a result of a simple mosquito bite. I will explain why it is so difficult to conquer this disease in the tropics and will share my personal story how we try to change this, manage innovation, and above all navigate through the minefield of peers, donors, governments and the UN to deliver life-changing simple technology to those that need it today – urgently.
Program Canvas Development
Hans Cremer (ABN AMRO Bank NV), Theo van der Tak, The Netherlands
Based on the success of business model canvas, which has been developed by 480 co-writers and of which 1 mio books have been sold, we aim for co-creation of an International Program Canvas using the Dutch format. This format has already been developed by over 100 program and project managers in the Netherlands. Attend this session and contribute to the development of the International Program Canvas.
A Game for Project Management Champion’s
GBJoseph Alba (Alba Project Management), United Kingdom
Ariane Moussault (Moussault Project Management), The Netherlands
This game encourages dialogue between experienced participants willing to share their ideas on the development of project management professionalism within organisations. The game focuses on different strategic areas to bring organisations up to the next level of PM Professionalism. The essence is to help each other fill their own transformation diagram by sharing experience which are triggered by questions and assignments.
Improve Earnings of a Project Business
Michael Boxheimer (Projekt- und Prozess- Managementsysteme Michael Boxheimer), Germany
Main focus of this workshop is how a professional project management approach can improve the earnings of a Project Business. Explore the objectives to progress results by improving project and process management practices. Michael explains several measures that have been implemented. Employees are empowered and the company moves to a learning organization.
Dialogue pays: Feeling is believing (Active and Creative Alignment Game for business and IT teams
Letty Tuinman, Caroline Klein and Geke Rosier (ForceFive), The Netherlands
Today’s innovative technology and consumer trends offer great opportunities for companies. To develop innovative and sustainable new services and products, Business and IT executives need to combine the best of their worlds. The reality is however, that they do not always work together in the most constructive way. An active Alignment Game bridges the gap between these worlds by increasing dialogue, mutual respect and creativity.
The Specification of a Structural Equation (SEM) Model for Project Communication, Trust, Collaboration and Success
ZATaryn Bond-Barnard, Herman Steyn, Lizelle Fletcher (University of Pretoria), South Africa

To ensure success, project managers spend much time communicating with team members and other stakeholders. The importance of ‘human factors’ such as communication, trust and collaboration amongst the project team members to ensure project success, is emphasized in literature. This paper seeks to obtain greater insight and expand on the theory underlying project communication management. The paper reviews current literature and presents a conceptual model that explains these constructs, their interdependencies and the elements that influence them.

Creating a PM Knowledge Incubator
Beverly Pasian (Utrecht University of Applied Sciences), The Netherlands
The next phase of the Dutch National Research Group will be revealed … one where practitioners and researchers—under the leadership of the Hogeschool Utrecht—will work together in a knowledge incubator. Together, we will develop tools, methods and skills that directly connect the findings of the human resource factors to the working project managers.
16.45
Keynote: Sajan Parihar (Project director Microsoft)- Unified work, project and portfolio management for 21st century
Unified work, project and portfolio management for 21st century
Choosing & delivering successful projects through communication & collaboration.
During this keynote Sajan will talk about Microsoft’s vision for work, project & portfolio management (PPM) and help attendees understand:
-How to ‘future-proof’ their PPM strategy?
-How Cloud, social and proliferation of devices have changed the way we collaborate and manage our tasks and projects with increased success?
-How to meet custom needs while shortening the time to value?
Keynote: Prof. Dr. Victor A.F. Lamme (Professor of Cognitive Neuroscience, University of Amsterdam, CEO of neuromarketing company Neurensics)
Getting things done by pushing the right buttons in the brain
A successful project depends on one thing only: inspiring and setting
in motion the people that have to do the work. This can only be achieved by pushing the right ‘buttons’
in their brains. I will show you how easily brains can
be manipulated, and how you can influence people’s thoughts, actions and decisions.
18.00
DRINKS AT WTC
19.00
WELCOME PARTY STADHUIS ROTTERDAM
Welcome Party (included)
On the first evening of the World Congress it is time to get to know your fellow attendees in a informal setting and to relax after the first day packed with information.
You are all invited to join our Welcome party.
The Grand Café Sorbonne is also the place to connect with other attendees and speakers
after the congress venue has closed its doors on Tuesday and Wednesday.

Time: Monday September 29, 19.00
Place: Rotterdam City Hall (until 20.30, maximum of 350 persons) and Grand Café Sorbonne (from 19.00 until closing time)

20.30
PARTY AT SORBONNE
The Grand Café Sorbonne is the place to connect with other attendees and speakers
after the congress venue has closed its doors on Tuesday and Wednesday.
Grand Café Sorbonne (from 19.00 until closing time)

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