Program day 1 Program day 2 Program day 3

08.00
REGISTRATION + BREAKFAST SESSIONS PROJECTPLACE (8.00 – 8.45 PENN ROOM 2)
CLICK HERE TO REGISTER FOR THE BREAKFAST SESSION
Projectplace Breakfast Seminar: Technology brings out the best in people
The story of how AkzoNobel creates the future with the help of smart project collaboration. Henk Boerboom, Director Project Management, shares some real life examples of strengthening communication within projects,
and tips for Project Managers on how to avoid becoming a project bottleneck. Joining Henk Boerboom at the seminar is Tobias Andersson, COO Projectplace.
When: Tuesday, Sept 30, 8-8:45am
Where: Penn Room 2 Make sure you’re ready for the trends that will shape your business going forward!

09.00
Keynote: Her Royal Highness Princess Laurentien of the Netherlands (Founder and Director Missing Chapter Foundation)
Innovating the world through Future Generation Dialogue
To deliver the essential projects for a sustainable future, we need to listen to young people.
Missing Chapter Foundation (MCF) – founded by Laurentien van Oranje – brings together children and decision-makers in the corporate and public sectors to stimulate innovative thinking and to break through traditional thinking patterns.
Empowering young stakeholders as change agents in society is both logical and valuable and motivates young people to participate actively in society.
H.R.H Princess Laurentien of the Netherlands.
Keynote: René van der Plas (Director Projectorganisation Maasvlakte, Havenbedrijf Rotterdam)
From early dialogue to sustainable port development, the Maasvlakte 2 approach.
After all, Maasvlakte 2 is more than just a large-scale infrastructure project; it is a port development for future generations.
Managing Director René van der Plas talks about how the project was kept on schedule and within budget. A sneak preview: long-term, linked parallel processes,
realistic risk management and business case-based direction turned out to be valuable management tools.
10.15
BREAK + POSTER SESSIONS
10.15 – 10.30 Poster Session 1
Formalising the informal? – Finding a balance between formal teams and communities of practice in a project-based organisation
The paper focuses on how a Scandinavian project-based organisation utilises both formal teams and communities of practice (CoP) in order to facilitate learning and knowledge sharing.
It also looks at the challenges and opportunities that are associated with this process. The purpose of the study on which this paper is based was to see how this Scandinavian project-based
organization transformed itself into a double-knit organisation – utilising effectively both formal and informal structures.

Ronald TebogoKeikotlhaile, Anandasivakumar Ekambaram, Siri Boe Halvorsen and Ole Jonny Klakegg

SPECIALTIES
BEST PRACTICES
ACADEMIC

WORLD CLASS PROJECTS
Diamond Room 1

COMPETENCE DEVELOPMENT
Diamond Room 2
LEADERSHIP
Van Oldebarneveldt
DEVELOPING PROJECTS
Mees Auditorium
TECHNICAL COMPETENCES
Leeuwen Room 1 + 2
STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT
Goudriaan Room 1 + 2
ACADEMIC 1
Penn Room 1
ACADEMIC 2
Penn Room 2
10.45

11.30
Infrastructure Project Excellence part 1:
Best practices in large infrastructure projects in Europe
GBAndrew Bell (Project Director Thales), United Kingdom &
LU
Pau Lian Staal-Ong (Programme Director NETLIPSE/AT Osborne & Ali Emam (Engineering and Development Organization of the City of Theran)

First part of double feature with in total four selected infrastructure projects presenting their secrets of success, building up towards an panel discussion between speakers and attendees

Any excellent infrastructure projects out there? Come discuss best practices in world class infrastructure projects. Award finalists will present their projects and with you we would like to better define excellence. To determine the unique aspects of an infrastructure project compared to others. To improve the way excellence is measured in infrastructure projects and improve the IPMA Project Excellence Model.

Project Management and Talent Management (HR) dialogue for competence development
Mr. Lahcen Zeggoud (Group Talent Director, Project Management Community, Alstom Corporate), France
In order to support the Group businesses with a sound value creation, Project Management needs to define, in a structured way, its profession (governance, structure, competency development) and its evolution (performance and visibility). We shall discuss how this was achieved through HR Talent management leading a dialogue within the PM communities, with other functions, with Universities and with IPMA.
Reinventing Communication: The Impact of Communication on Project Performance
Mark Phillips (Standpipe Manager, Inc.), USA
During this presentation, Mark will explain the impact of communication on project performance. Good communication is mandatory, not optional. Good communication is the responsibility of the Project Manager. In this workshop participants will experience the impact of good communication and will share how they can successfully reinventing communication in their own projects.
Increasing Personal Capability through Project Coaching
Elissa June Farrow (About Your Transition), Australia
Project coaching is a valid support process to formal project management training. Elissa outlines the meaning of project coaching, and what scenarios would suit having a project coach. She discusses the difference between coaching and mentoring and explains some techniques for attendees to apply in their workplaces. Learn why coaching is an important skill set for building project management capability.
Project Budget Campaign: A Creative Process Based Approach
Puian Masudifar and Baharak HajiAhmadi (Vira Control), Iran
Project Budget Campaign is the outcome of blending Cost Management with Agile methods. Different project stakeholders resolve cost conflicts through an agile method. Walk away from this session knowing about project campaigns and its creative approach. It brings you improved quality of decision making and buy in from all involved.
Stakeholdermanagement: lessons from the North South Line project
Gerard Fritz Scheffrahn (AT Osborne B.V.), The Netherlands
In 2008, a plurality of historic canal houses sagged due to the construction of a new subway station in Amsterdam’s city center. The accident led to a crisis in the three billion euro North South Line project. Only an elaborate program of interventions could restore trust and gain the support to continue the construction. But how to deliver a successful project when the whole world is against you?
How unplanned changes emerge while implementing a Project Management Information System (PMIS) in a complex multi project R&D environment
Jan Willem Tromp (Glow Management) and Thijs Homan (Open University), The Netherlands

While implementing our Project Management Information Systems (PMIS) I experienced that despite an approved implementation plan small local interactions can create huge unplanned changes. In my role as an implementing consultant I am part of the politics, loyalty, anxiety, power and conflict that influence the implementation process. In order to get better understanding of what happens and how this influences the implementation and my personal role, I used a reflective narrative approach as research as a practice (auto-ethnographic). After the reflection I studied beside literature from the dominant discourse also an alternative view called the complex responsive processes view of relating. The main conclusion is that the complex responsive processes view gives extra insight in what is actually happening.

Collaboration between subsidiaries with different disciplines in the construction industry
Marian Bosch-Rekveldt, Marcel Hertog and Jara Brinkman, The Netherlands
This research investigated factors influencing collaboration between subsidiaries working in different disciplines of the construction industry. Collaboration was operationalized in soft and hard collaboration. Trust, Agreements and Clarity of Organizational Goals were shown to have significant influence on hard and soft collaboration. Additionally, Innovation and Flexibility were shown to significantly influence hard collaboration. With the results from the quantitative study, a scheme was developed to assess the current state of collaboration between subsidiaries. This scheme can be used to develop from “sentenced partnership” to “collaboration”.
11.45
Infrastructure Project Excellence part 2:
Best practices in large infrastructure projects in Europe
GBAndrew Bell (Project Director Thales), United Kingdom &
Pau Lian Staal-Ong (Programme Director NETLIPSE/AT Osborne), The Netherlands & Ali Emam (Engineering and Development Organization of the City of Theran)
Second part of double feature with in total four selected infrastructure projects presenting their secrets of success, building up towards an panel discussion between speakers and attendeesAny excellent infrastructure projects out there? Come discuss best practices in world class infrastructure projects. Award finalists will present their projects and with you we would like to better define excellence. To determine the unique aspects of an infrastructure project compared to others. To improve the way excellence is measured in infrastructure projects and improve the IPMA Project Excellence Model.

 

Dialogue, a magic word for certification success and innovation.
Philippe Brun (senior bids & projects manager, Thales Corporate), France
In 2011, Thales launched a global certification process for their project managers, complemented, since 2013, by its participation to Project Excellence Award. We shall discuss how dialog within a community of certified PM’s, with other internal functions, IPMA and the Excellence Awards community is a fundamental lever to obtain a sustainable process of competence development, mitigating risks and leading to innovation.
On track with Gung Ho
Michel Munier,
Bart Hoitink (NIMO Projectmanagement Instituut), The Netherlands
Gungh Ho, known from Ken Blanchard is a valuable management method to inspire people in organisations and achieve better results. This practical workshop contains the ins en outs about the Beaver, the Squirrel and the Goose. Experience how to use metaphors to inspire your project or team.
Certification? Why should you?
Wim De Gier (LeasePlan), The Netherlands
Certification is often seen as a superfluous job for Project Managers all over the world; such a lot of work and if you are good, people will find you anyway. But there is more. How can certification supports your professional career? How does it provide insight in your strenghts and weaknesses as an instrument of reflection for project managers on the higher levels?
Optimization Projects Portfolio Efficiency Using Data Envelopment Analysis Technique: An Application to Energy Sector Investment Projects Portfolio
Mojtaba Tajik and Ali Mokaberi (Mapna Group), Iran
Data Envelopment Analysis is a method of efficiency analysis. This approach is applied to an energy sector investment projects portfolio comprising twelve power plants providing more than 18% of national electricity grid capacity in Iran. The DEA Model approach strongly improved the financial and technical efficiency of the portfolio. Optimize your portfolio efficiency or simply define a practical target for projects portfolio performance during this session.
A Program Management Approach through the Paradigm Shift of Intervention in Regeneration of Deteriorated urban areas
Aida-Rahimi Golkhandan (Nosazan-e-Shahr-e-Tehran), Iran
Amirhosein Mohebifar (Nosazan-e-Shahr-e-Tehran), Iran
The city of Tehran, covering thousands of acres of deteriorated urban areas, suffers from a large seismic risk. Due to the large population and the poor quality of constructions, the occurrence of an earthquake could result in a human catastrophe.
Take part in this session if you are interested in urban program management and want to learn more about a successful sample of dialogue.
An Extended Literature Review of Organizational Factors Impacting Project Management Complexity
NOBassam Hussein and Claudia Gutierrez (The Norwegian University of science and Technology), Norway
Project complexity has been widely researched in the project management literature. However, little attention has been given to the complexity of the managerial task, including preparing the project manager to understand and respond to that complexity. With this paper, we aim to contribute to the literature of project management complexity. Following a systematic literature review, we provide insights into the concept of project management complexity, and identify a set of eight organizational factors that impact project management complexity. These factors are interconnected and dynamic due to relationships among stakeholders. Therefore, we have utilized a project network approach in order to provide a framework that facilitates the grouping and visualization of the organizational factors. Our findings show first, that the concept of project management complexity is equal to managerial complexity, and second, the possible complicated situations created by the interconnection of the factors, as well as their possible impact. Rather than providing a prescriptive list of factors, the contribution of this paper is to clarify the concept of project management complexity, to determine the potential impact of the organizational factors in the managerial task, and to gain better understanding on the situations created by the interconnectedness and dynamic of factors in relation to the project network actors. This work is aimed to help the project manager to reduce the managerial complexity by acquiring awareness and understanding of complicated situations.
Conflict resolution to project performance
Tomas Prieto-Remon, Isabel Ortiz-Marcos, Jose Cobo-Benita, Angel Uruburu-Colsa, Spain
Conflict resolution is a key issue to manage when dealing with diverse stakeholders. By analyzing in depth the most relevant and implicit aspects of the construct “conflict”, this study focuses on examining how the five main strategies in solving common disagreements are adopted by considering different conflict sources. Hypotheses are tested using data collected from both the academic and business world. Perceptions of project managers and team members allows the authors not only to find significant differences by role played or type of organization, but to narrow the design of future approaches to investigate the relation between conflict and project performance. More specifically, the research indicates that project managers adopt confronting and compromising styles in most cases as first options, highlighting the influence of responsibility degree factor in how issues are undertaken within a project team.
12.30
LUNCH BREAK
LUNCH SESSION IN THE BLUE ROOM:
Project management in international firms

How the globalizing business landscape affects the competences of the project manager
Organized by the IPMA-NL SIG on project management in higher education.
Moderated by A.J.Gilbert Silvius, professor of project and programme management at LOI University of Applied Sciences.
The globalizing business landscape creates new challenges for staffing and HR professionals. Working in an international context requires additional competences, such as language proficiency and intercultural communication. Also in project management, internalization adds a new dimension In this panel discussion, HR and project management professionals will meet with project management educators in order to discover the additional competences of the international project manager.
LUNCH SESSION:
Agile/Lean and Agile/Lean and Emotionally Competent Leadership in Practice
Jerzy Maciej Stawicki (JS Project), Poland
Agile and Lean Management constitute a new approach to management and leadership of People and project teams. They are focused on self-organized, motivated, cross-functional teams, their empowerment, development and also on continuous improvement of business and project environment. What is however missing is emotional intelligence. Only competences and practices of emotional intelligence enable understanding of people, their attitudes and motivations.
LUNCH BREAK

 

LUNCH SESSION:
Still changing gears manually? Efficiency in the 21st Century
Peter O’Neill (TPG The Project Group), UK; Sponsored by Microsoft
How TPG helps NATS, Orange Business Services, QinetiQ & BAE Systems automate and improve their PPM and Finance performance. From agile, short term projects, to long term investment planning – removing manual processes & data transfers has provided efficiencies across resource utilisation and improved ROI across their portfolios.
LUNCH SESSION:
Leadership
Liselore Havermans (University of Amsterdam/VU University Amsterdam)
Trust. Creativity. Collaboration. Motivation. Leadership. Well-being. Personal Development.
How do these human factors influence your project and program management choices, behavior and attitudes? The Dutch National Research Group asked dozens of project and program managers in a national workshop series earlier this year that brought together academic and industry leaders in the field of project management. The answers will inform, motivate and inspire you. Please join us in a special series of master classes held each day in during the lunch break of the congress. More information on the series and DNRG will be provided, and opportunities for your involvement in the next stages as we create tools based on this research will be identified.
LUNCH SESSION:
Well Being
Beverly Pasian (Erasmus University)
Trust. Creativity. Collaboration. Motivation. Leadership. Well-being. Personal Development.
How do these human factors influence your project and program management choices, behavior and attitudes? The Dutch National Research Group asked dozens of project and program managers in a national workshop series earlier this year that brought together academic and industry leaders in the field of project management. The answers will inform, motivate and inspire you. Please join us in a special series of master classes held each day in during the lunch break of the congress. More information on the series and DNRG will be provided, and opportunities for your involvement in the next stages as we create tools based on this research will be identified.

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13.45

14.30
Meet the Winners
PE Award Finalists (IPMA Project Excellence Award)

“Meet the Winners” is the only possibility to meet all finalists of IPMA Project Excellence Awards 2014, talk to them and wish them good luck before the Award Gala at which Winners will be announced. At “Meet the Winners” companies will present the projects they applied with. This is also a great chance to find out finalists achievements and challenges which they overcome and learn their key to a success.

Dialogue: the recipe for PMO’s success
Nicole Baard (DUO), The Netherlands
Goal of this presentation is to take the audience through the history of changes in the PMO role as it evolved and matured alongside our project organization, DUO. And at the foundation of this success lies the power of dialogue. We will be presenting the audience with a role play. Come and see for yourself!
Value-based Project Management: Building Bridges with Danny Ocean
Nicoline Mulder (Mulder Projectmanagement/Finext), The Netherlands
Danny Ocean and his friends succeeded a complex project based on shared values, a constant focus on the higher purpose and trust. This value-based project management approach is inspired by his ideas. A new leading perspective on project management based on scientific knowledge. Are you ready for a new way of thinking? Experience this new approach by Nicoline Mulder.
Do competences of PMO staff cover all responsibitlities and tasks of PMOs?
Matti Haukka (Project Institute Finland ltd), Finland
and
PLGrazyna Rzymkowska (National Bank of Poland)
Most organizations have already implemented a PMO function one way or another or are at least planning to do so. Regardless of how it is organized there are a lot of tasks and responsibilities related to projectmanagement that a PMO can take care of.
During this presentation Mr. Haukka starts with his experience and view on PMO from a theoretical point of view. After which Mrs. Rzymkowska will share her experience in practice of PMO specialists within IT central banking projects provinding project management innovations.
Modifying EPC Model as a dialogue between Owners and Constructors
Gregory Osagie Akhibi and Claude Esekody (Shell), Nigeria
Statistics indicate that the standard form of Engineering, Procurement and Construction (EPC) contracting strategies has under-performed in meeting the needs of clients. We examine the challenges facing the EPC model in achieving engineering project objectives and advocate the early involvement of contractors. Learn how project failures are linked to the old EPC model and about a strategy for modifying the current approach into a new one to achieve success.
Project office – with the right organisation for a participative road project in dialogue with the stakeholders
Andreas Schuster (Kantonales Tiefbauamt Thurgau), Switzerland
The design of a project office in a Swiss cantonal administrative authority for a road construction project of country significance, requires a dialogue with the population. The challenge is winning a public cantonal vote for a new road in dialogue with every stakeholder. Andreas shows ways to involve the right people taking their responsibility and creating a critical mass to guide the change.

Perceptions on project complexity: ignore or exploit?
Bram Kool, Marian Bosch-Rekveldt, Marcel Hertogh, Maarten Kraneveld, The Netherlands

Understanding and dealing with complexity has become one of the major focusses within project management science. This research focused on understanding differences in perceptions of project complexity and their consequences within large construction projects. We identified different sources of perceived complexities, the implications on project performance and the implications for project management. The results stipulate a management approach which exploits different perceived complexities and show that the right attitude can make a difference in dealing with complexity in large construction projects.

Burnout – at what risk are project managers in Germany and Austria?
Tatjana Reichart, Roswitha Muller-Ettrich, Werner Kissling (Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Centrum fuer Disease Management), Germany
Burnout imposes risk factors for mental diseases. An online questionnaire assessed project managers’ burnout risk. The study included 965 participants from Germany and Austria. One third reached high values in exhaustion, cynicism and inefficacy. Burnout risks were: excessive demands; lack of financial reward, recognition and support by supervisors; work interruption and undefined goals. Also being perfectionist and having high demands contributed to burnout. The study shows high risk for burnout in project managers and calls for prevention measures.
14.45
World Class Energy Projects part 1
Opening by Gholamreza (Kami) Safakish,
Keynote speakers:
Luigi Antonioli (Tecnimont), Riccardo Fabbri (GE Oil & Gas)

Several dozen of us will sit together to build the IPMA global award for “energy excellence” — global values so important for our world today — Sustainability, Innovation, Environment and Human Health, Green Energy, etc. Two industry experts and experienced project directors from Oil Gas and Tecnimont SpA will share emerging trends and industry needs. Just by being there you will maximize your opportunities to be informed and to participate in future Energy awards.
More information:
http://ipma.ch/assets/aw_IPMA_EnergyAw-Annoncing_04_for-web.pdf

Developing project management learning through a triple dialogue
John Hermarij (Director, Dhirata), The Netherlands
Traditional project managers need to develop themselves to cope with the inevitable changes caused by globalization. This presentation is about implementing the principles that will enable this change. A dialogue on three levels in which organizations need to engage their project managers in order to ready them for these changes. How a blended form of learning will extend the development beyond the training room into the practice of every day (professional) life.

Horizontal management: directing without authorization

Jan Dirk Hogendoorn (Finext) and Hans Licht (Organisatieregie), The Netherlands

How can I take responsibility without the right authorization? Horizontal management can best be defined as directing the co-operation of independent organizations and people towards a defined goal. But cooperation is not always obvious. How does this work in practice? Through dialogue with the participants both will share their experiences as a consultant and as a practitioner.

Realizing customer value in an ever changing brave new world – The benefit of PPM as a competitive advantage
Harrie Kisters (Gartner Nederland B.V.), The Netherlands
This presentations shows how customer value could be realized in the following steps:
– Generate customer value and realize benefits
– Define value propositions and value realization
– Show the relationship between: – Vision, Mission, Strategy, Objectives and – Value Proposition and Value realization
– Show the three elements of the internal and external governance, how these elements should work together
From the Project Management to Business Objectives: how to make the project goals aligned to the business strategy.
Luca Cavone (JMAC Europe S.p.A.), Italy
There is a clear and immediate correlation between performance management programs and improved business results. This session presents a number of cases where Hoshin Kanri, a Japanese methodology for change management, was applied. The methodology integrates flows from outlining strategic objectives, linking the goals with the company’s operating results. Get priorities managed, activate the organization in creating a shared consensus and create a coherent system for managing the continues improvement!
Stakeholder management in multi-party R&D programs
Jan Brouwer (TNO), The Netherlands
The Dutch research program on Carbon Capture, Transport and Storage (CATO) is carried out as a 5 year R&D project and involves 40 stakeholders from industry, government, academia, research institutes and NGO’s. Stakeholder interests largely vary, spanning the full spectrum from knowledge development to technology deployment. Learn about governance models and stakeholder management in multi-party R&D projects.
Bridging the Research Practice Gap: The research project Rethink!Project Stakeholder Management as an example
ATMartina Huemann, Claudia Weniger, Pernille Eskerod, Austria
The research project Rethink!PSM – Rethink Project Stakeholder Management was a cooperation between the Vienna University of Economics and Business and the University of Southern Denmark and was performed between January 2012 and September 2014. The objectives of the project, which was partly sponsored by PMI were:
• to analyze the stakeholder theory especially the modern stakeholder theory to get new insight for the development of a comprehensive stakeholder management in the context of SD
• analyze and demonstrate new working form for a comprehensive stakeholder management
• to define potentials and limits regarding a comprehensive stakeholder management in the context of SD
We will introduce the research process as well as the main findings of the Research Project: Rethink!Project Stakeholder Management. The research is based on stakeholder theory (Freemann, 1984; Freeman et al 2007, Freeman et al 2010) and social system theory (Luhmann 1995), aimed to contribute to the further development of project stakeholder management by contributing systemic methods for project managers and project teams to better grasp the complexity of project stakeholder landscapes.
Gender Diversity and Team Identification
NLBrian Doornenbal and Liselore Havermans, The Netherlands

Many project-based organizations within the IT sector suffer from an underrepresentation of women within the workforce (Chasserio & Legault, 2010). Although this underrepresentation has primarily been studied in relation to women, we argue that this skewed gender distribution has consequences for both women and men. As individuals within project-based organizations are more often required to work together in project teams (Lindgren & Packendorff, 2006), own performance is increasingly dependent on the outcomes of gender diverse groups. Current knowledge on gender diversity within project-based organizations indicates that women are generally perceived as less valuable than men (cf. Lindgren & Packendorff, 2006). As women are often assigned poorer qualities than men, yet are part of project teams, it is likely that the underrepresentation of women affects both women and men.

In this present study, we demonstrate that gender diversity can decrease the team identification of all members of a project team. In our study setting, project team members in by men dominated teams identified themselves less with their team when one of the group members was a woman. This negative influence of gender diversity on team identification was moderated by team performance satisfaction. When team members were satisfied with their team performance, gender diversity had a negative influence on both cognitive team identification and affective team identification. This negative influence of gender diversity on team identification disappeared, however, when team members were satisfied with the performance of their team.

15.30
BREAK + POSTER SESSIONS
15.30 – 15.45 Poster Session 2
Developing countries’ enterprises those are willing to improve their employees’ capabilities which would lead them to have innovative organizations and bring them a permanent competitive advantage,
can form strategic alliances with other successful enterprises to share their knowledge and learn from each other indeed. however to have a successful learning process, we should know the factors which influence
this process and to recognize these factors we can review the studies which have been done by expert researchers in this field and derive a list of critical success factors (CSFs), which is the aim of this paper.

Razieh Tavallaei, Mujtaba Hosseinali pour and Amirhossein Mohebifar

16.00
World Class Energy Projects part 2

Opening by Gholamreza (Kami) Safakish,
Keynote speakers:
Luigi Antonioli (Tecnimont), Riccardo Fabbri (GE Oil & Gas)

Several dozen of us will sit together to build the IPMA global award for “energy excellence” — global values so important for our world today — Sustainability, Innovation, Environment and Human Health, Green Energy, etc. Two industry experts and experienced project directors from Oil Gas and Tecnimont SpA will share emerging trends and industry needs. Just by being there you will maximize your opportunities to be informed and to participate in future Energy awards.
More information:
http://ipma.ch/assets/aw_IPMA_EnergyAw-Annoncing_04_for-web.pdf

Shell`s Project Academy Competence Development Program
Terry Plimmer (Project Academy’s Assessment & Accreditation Lead, Shell)
In 2005 Shell set out to develop Shell Project Academy, a world-class competence development programme to develop a pool of project professionals capable of delivering sustained, top quartile performance in Shell’s capital investment programme. The key elements, features, and challenges of the Academy and its evolution will be discussed.
Wanted: the project leader of the future
NLMartijn Gribnau (IPSoft), The Netherlands
In this workshop the speaker and the participants will together define the future project leader. Which key competences are necessary for fruitful leadership? How to combine Agile, Lean management and horizontal management? The sessions of the day will be combined in clear statements: are you in or out? Wanted: a project leader!
Dynamic Strategy Insights – Dialogue with project owners and stakeholdersPart 1- plenary session 15 min.
Part 2 – interactive with 40 attendees
Rudolf Christopher Takac (2BCognitus), Slovakia

Dialogue with project-owners and stakeholders has to be focused on aspects as: exploring effective ways to align strategy and execution, cascading overall strategy, bringing clarity to complex decision situations etc. There is also a need to develop a robust framework which could be integrated into management systems in order to enable value creation processes across all levels of organization. Rudolf will take you through this process during this workshop.

How to share lessons learned. Case study of a Telecommunication Project: fiber deployment FTTH in Bogotá (Colombia)
Isabel Ortiz Marcos (Universidad Politécnica de Madrid), Spain
This presentation shares the lessons learned during the development of a Telecommunication Project in Colombia. Target of the program is to roll-out a fiber network to the 10 million households in “Gran Bogotá”. During five years a team of 2.500 people were involved. After phase one (June 2013) lessons learned were captured during workshops encouraging the dialogue between all participants.
Megacities, Megaproblems, Megaprojects
Luiz Rocha (IPMA Brasil), Brasil
Vianna Tavares (Netlipse), Brasil
Governing growing urban populations at a global scale will requires a long-term view and sound planning of the infrastructure is essential. As well as well-thought analysis of the existing social-ecological landscapes in order to provide resilient infrastructures to cope with sustainability challenges. This session will address the major challenges of metropolitan infrastructure projects as well as the engagement of stakeholders through a solid dialogue.
Project Performance Audit: Enhanced Protocols for Triple Bottom Line Results
Alexia Nalewaik (QS Requin Corporation) USA
AUAnthony Mills (Deakin University) Australia

This research presents a model for project performance review. Developed in response to demand from Owners and Practitioners, it fills a gap in both research and practice. While performance audits and metrics have been conducted in government for decades, the application to projects is fairly new. The model focuses on giving stakeholders confidence in project delivery. It enables qualitative and quantitative findings, is flexible and modular, and can be applied in any industry, sector, and country, while satisfying regulatory requirements.

Making sense of the temporary organization in innovation: A case description
NLKirsten Feldbrugge (TU Delft / Targetpoint), The Netherlands

Instead of viewing projects as temporary organizations, in practice projects are still often treated as delivery tools. How this approach can inhibit opportunities for collaboration and project success is illustrated by the case of an innovation project on future housing. It shows how sensemaking on matters of uncertainty in the unfamiliar organizational form of this innovation project was neglected. This deprived the project of the emergence of shared meanings, leading to considerable disappointments and differing perspectives regarding the project outcome.

16.45
Keynote: Andrew Crawford (Head of Operations: Multiplatform BBC, News )
BBC W1 Program
Broadcasting House is the BBC’s largest creative hub in the UK, providing public service broadcasting to a worldwide audience of more than 150 million every week via TV, Radio and Online.
Andrew Crawford, Head of Operations, will share the journey taken to deliver the largest capital project the corporation has undertaken, completed on time and under budget.
Keynote: Simon Henley (currently Director Defence Services Strategy, Rolls-Royce plc)
Making International Collaborative Projects Work
International Collaborative projects usually deliver a project that no one nation or company could afford to do on their own, but have a reputation for doing so late, expensively,
and delivering a product which is less than state of the art. Simon Henley has been a senior player in a number of collaborative multinational projects,
and will use his experience to discuss what factors can make collaboration more effective and efficient.
18.00
DRINKS AT THE WTC
18.30
WELCOME GALA DINNER
IPMA Award Gala Dinner (separate registration needed)
On Tuesday one of the highlights of the year will take place in the breathtaking surroundings of the oldest building of Rotterdam, the monumental Laurens Church.
See which projects will win the prestigious Project Excellence Awards while enjoying a signature gala dinner, live music and dancing.

Time: Tuesday September 30, 18.30
Place: Laurens Church Rotterdam, (Grotekerkplein 15)

19.00
_
00.00
GALA DINNER
IPMA Award Gala Dinner (separate registration needed)
On Tuesday one of the highlights of the year will take place in the breathtaking surroundings of the oldest building of Rotterdam, the monumental Laurens Church.
See which projects will win the prestigious Project Excellence Awards while enjoying a signature gala dinner, live music and dancing.

Time: Tuesday September 30, 19.00
Place: Laurens Church Rotterdam, (Grotekerkplein 15)